SOCIO-ECONOMIC FEATURE

A. AGRICULTURE

San Mateo is largely an agricultural economy. A total of 10,813.42 has. or 89.66% of the total land area of the municipality are devoted to agriculture. This is shown by the fact that about 90% of the population depends on agriculture as the main source of livelihood and income. The crops grown are rice, corn, munggo, high value commercial crops, and ornamentals. Poultry/Livestock and fish production are also practiced in the municipality.

  1. Crop Production
    1. Rice: Rice is its major crop. The municipality has a total area of 8,353 hectares of cropland devoted to rice production. These areas are 100% effective irrigated having two cropping in a year. For 2017, the total production was 112,477.93 MT valued at PhP17.00/kg. with an average production of 6.7 MT or 134 cavans per hectare. As per data gathered, there are agro-equipment present in the municipality to facilitate rice production such as twenty-three (23) units water pumps, two hundred sixty-four (264) units thresher, twenty-nine (29) units mechanical dryer, two hundred twenty-two (222) units multi-purpose drying pavement, two (2) units palay shed, one hundred five (105) units 4-wheeled tractors,  one hundred thirty (130) units combine harvester, twenty (20) Rice Mills, 1,511 units hand tractor and fourteen (14) units mechanical transplanter.
    2. Corn: Corn is the secondary source of cereal requirements in the municipality.  Area devoted to corn production is 653.50 hectares with three cropping per year having an annual average yield production of 7 MT per hectare or a total production of 13,723.5 metric tons valued at P123,631 more or less.
    3. Munggo: Munggo known to be as the Black Gold of San Mateo and the primary OTOP of the municipality. The alternative cropping of munggo as additional source of income of farmers during summer and restored the fertility of the soil. A total of 7,358 has. land area is devoted to munggo production. The average yield production is 1,000 kgs. per hectare producing a total of 1.0 metric tons valued at PhP45,000.
    4. High Value Commercial Crops: Numerous high value commercial crops are planted in the municipality for local consumption and for sale in nearby towns. Different vegetables like string beans (sitaw), okra, gabi, bitter ground, squash, eggplant, sweet potato and others are being planted by the farmers. Total land area for vegetable production is more or less 175 hectares. Fruit bearing trees like coconut, papayas, and mangoes are also planted in the area but mostly in home backyards. Several farmers go into large scale production like mangoes, coconut & bananas for market outside San Mateo.
    5. Ornamentals: Brgy. Sinamar Norte in San Mateo is known for its ornamental cutflowers. Different variety of chrysanthemum and Baby’s breath are being grown here. People from San Mateo and other neighboring towns need not go to Baguio for their floral needs.
  2. Livestock and Poultry Production
    1. Livestock: The commonly raised livestock in the municipality are carabao, cattle, swine, goat, sheep and horse. As per data gathered, in 2016 there are 6,485 raisers while on 2017 there are 4,557 raisers of different livestock with a total of 8,753 and 7,853 livestock population in 2016 and 2017 respectively which are specified as follows:
      Table 4. Comparative data on No. of Raisers and Livestock Population, 2016 to 2017
      Livestock Number of Raisers No. of Heads (all ages)
      Male Female Total
      2016 2017 2016 2017 2016 2017 2016 2017
      Source: Municipal Agriculture Office
      Carabao 422 719 148 614 422 149 570 763
      Cattle 2,234 1,734 785 1,019 2,234 1,993 3,019 3,012
      Swine 3,218 1,712 1,131 1,143 3,218 1,863 4,334 3,006
      Goat 607 358 212 273 603 698 815 971
      Sheep 2 28 3 47 5 26 8 73
      Horse 2 6 2 7 5 - 7 7
      Total 6,485 4,557 2,281 3,103 6,487 4,729 8,753 7,832

      Livestock raisers in 2017 had decreased of 1,928 or almost 20% of the total raisers in 2016, and it follows that the livestock population also decreases from 8,753 in 2016 to 7,832 in 2017 with percentage decrease of more than 10% or 921 total population. Production of swine contributed to the decrease of livestock population. Looking in the gender of the livestock production, there is significant increased with male population but decreasing in female population. This indicates that this year, livestock population will also decline.
    2. Poultry: the commonly raised are chicken, duck, turkey goose and bengala.  As per data gathered, there are 5,941 on 2016 and 12,256 on 2017 of poultry production with the total of 118,810 and 70,673 poultry population on 2016 and 2017 respectively which are specified as follows:
      Table 5. Comparative data on No. of Raisers and Poultry Population, 2016 to 2017
      Poultry Number of Raisers Number of Heads
      2016 2017 2016 2017
      Source: Municipal Agriculture Office
      Chicken 3,031 8,416 60,341 53,483
      Duck 2,871 3,646 57,421 16,635
      Turkey 32 118 640 293
      Goose 4 79 391 262
      Bengala 3 - 17 -
      Total 5,941 12,256 118,810 70,673

      The data shows that raisers on 2016 doubled the number of raisers on 2017 but decreased of poultry production of 48,137 heads equivalent to more than 41% of the total poultry population in the year 2016. This implies that new raisers and some of the big raisers opted to go with small scale production.

      Duck raising is the secondary OTOP of the municipality. The dispersal of ducks to farmers brought forth another sprawling industry – the egg production.
  3. Fish and Aquaculture Production

    San Mateo is endowed with rivers and creeks which make aquaculture development very rich source of livelihood.  As per data gathered, there are 124.60 has. of fishpond within the municipality. A total of 17.78 has. are hatcheries and raising tilapia fingerlings with Twenty-One (21) operators and 6.67 has. are engaged in backyard fishponds with 40 fisherfolk operating in the municipality.

    As per data gathered, there is a total production of 15M fingerlings with a total value of 5M per year and 150MT harvest of grow-out fish with a total value of 12M per year.

    Recent technological advancements have been employed to improve the culture of tilapia species and the introduction of prawn or “ulang”, pangasius and catfish industry.
  4. Other Agricultural Activities
    1. Swine dispersal to the different NGOs in the different barangays as well as goat dispersal projects.
    2. Distribution of fruit bearing seedlings and vegetable seeds/seedlings for backyard production purposes.
    3. Organic Production thru vermi-composting of every barangays and other National Government Organizations.
    4. Seminars on crop alternatives, peanut and root crops growing.
    5. Programs on organic farming practice, native chicken & pig production and identification of compost producers.
    6. Munggo Processing by different Local Women Organization members. Munggo products are butchi, empanada, munggo pulvoron, pancit balatong, chips, yema, coffee, and flour. These are already available in the market.
    7. Salted Egg Industry by the Pag-Asa Bayanihan Association (PBA).
    8. Agri-kapihan sa Barangay
    9. Babuyang walang amoy
    10. Techno-Demo Farm Training Center
    11. Organic Production & Farming
    12. Sapat na Pagkain sa Bawat Tahanan
    13. Plant Now Pay Later (PNPL) of mung-bean seed

B. COMMERCE, TRADE & INDUSTRY

The center of commerce in the municipality is located at the poblacion where the public market is located. This augmented by the surrounding areas and those along the national highway and the provincial road.

Other commercial area is located in the different barangays. Commercial areas have significant increase of 117% from 9.46 hectares in 2000 to 20.5332 hectares in 2009. This year, there is a continuous increase of commercial areas between the year 2009 and 2017 showing 24% increase which has totaled to 25.42306 has. this year. This is mostly in barangays adjacent to the poblacion due to its proximity to the central business district.

Business activity in San Mateo shows a promising sign to would be investors who want to engage business in the locality. Data disclosed that for 2017, a total input of capitalization in financing the growing business activities of the municipality reached to 500 million pesos with a total gross sales reaching to one (1) billion pesos. 

As to the percentage distribution of the major types of establishment in 2017, the data as shown in table 6, there are 1,749 registered business establishments with a total of 2,435 business lines. Among these business lines in the area, trading activity plays the biggest percentage with 74.91% or 1,824 line of businesses while rendering services ranks second with 21.52% or 524 line of businesses, followed by manufacturing with 3.57% or 87 lines of businesses.

Table 6. Registered Business by Category, 2017
Line of Business Registered Business Line
New Renew Close Total
Source: Office of the Mayor-Business Permit and Licensing Section
Agricultural Products 4 18 0 22
Amusement Places 5 29 0 34
Banks 0 9 0 9
Distributor 2 3 0 5
Educational Institutions 0 10 0 10
Fishponds/Fishpen 0 1 0 1
Hospital/Clinics 0 22 0 22
Lessor/Apartments 1 40 0 41
Manufacturer/Processors/producers (essential) 14 50 0 64
Manufacturer/Processors/producers (non-essential) 2 20 0 22
Other financial institution 6 36 0 42
Peddler 2 5 0 7
Reaper (double) 4 13 0 17
Restaurant/eateries 31 100 1 132
Retailer (essential) 23 244 0 267
Retailer (non-essential) 160 1,218 1 1,379
Services/Contractors 25 189 0 214
Telecommunications/others 0 3 0 3
Wholesaler/Dealer (Non-essential) 4 27 0 31
Wholesaler/Dealer 13 100 0 113
Total 296 2,137 2 2,435
Total No. of Registered Business Establishments 1,749
Table 7. Comparative Data on Business Activities in the Municipality, 2016-2017
Business Activities 2016 2017
Total Registered Business Lines 3,097 2,435
Total Registered Business Establishments 1,674 1,739
Number of New Business 285 229
Number of Business Renewals 1,389 1,520
Amount of New Capital Investments (in pesos) 83,329,300.02 196,660,983.00
Amount of Total Capital Investments (in pesos) - 501,731,933.32
Number of Employees 4,812 5,118

C. COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF COLLECTION (2013-2017)

The table below shows the comparative statement collection from year 2013 to 2017. The collections of the municipality on different taxes display an increasing trend with 13.78% mean annual growth rate.

Table 8. Comparative Statement of Collection, 2013 to 2017
2013 2014 2015 2016 2017
Source: Office of the Municipal Treasury
Real Property Taxes 9,879,758.86 12,503,028.00 11,309,677.16 12,643,866.96 14,245,179.82
Business Taxes 8,293,988.44 8,887,257.94 9,203,917.48 9,618,111.83 10,454,664.21
Fees & Charges 9,378,864.02 16,557,382.63 19,368,658.09 22,383,160.04 23,098,646.55
Receipt from EEDMO 13,764,982.65 17,879,365.41 18,419,460.95 19,679,066.39 21,442,125.97
Total 41,317,593.97 55,827,033.98 58,301,713.68 64,324,205.22 69,240,616.55

D. LABOR & EMPLOYMENT

According to the latest census of PSA in 2015, there are 46,326 population composing the labor force of the municipality and it is computed to have 61.24% participation rate showing that there are 28,732 ages 15 years old and above who are gainful workers and almost 69% of this are males as shown in table 10. This table also shows that most of the workers engaged with elementary occupations covering almost 39% followed by service and sales workers with almost 15% while armed forces occupations have the least number of workers with 0.27%. This year, labor force of the municipality is estimated to have 48,000 gainful workers.

Table 9. Comparative Data on Labor Force, Labor Force Participation Rate, Employment Rate, Unemployment Rate and Underemployment Rate between Municipality of San Mateo and Province of Isabela
  Isabela San Mateo
Source: Philippine Statistics Authority, 2015 Census of Population/Isabela Quick Facts 2017/CBMS 2012-2013
Labor Force 673,066 46,326
Labor Force Participation Rate 60.73 61.24
Employment Rate 95.00 93.13
Unemployment Rate 5.00 7.09
Underemployment 16.00 34.09


Table 10. Gainful Workers 15 Years Old and Over by Major Occupation Group, Sex, and City/Municipality: 2015
Major Occupation Group Total Gainful Workers 15 Years Old and Over
Source: Philippine Statistics Authority, 2015 Census of Population
Both Sexes Male Female
Managers 2,259 1,186 1,073
Professionals 1,646 607 1,039
Technicians and Associate Professionals 932 553 379
Clerical Support Workers 967 456 511
Service and Sales Workers 4,461 1,678 2,783
Skilled Agricultural Forestry and Fishery Workers 3,925 3,545 380
Craft and Related Trades Workers 1,672 1,552 120
Plant and Machine Operators and Assemblers 1,660 1,634 26
Elementary Occupations 11,099 8,506 2,593
Armed Forces Occupations 79 75 4
Other Occupation Not Elsewhere Classified - - -
Not Reported 32 14 18
Total 28,732 19,806 8,926

E. EDUCATION

The municipality has adequate number of schools from pre-schools to the tertiary level, public and private. Two barangays do not have elementary schools but it is accessible to the next barangays that has elementary schools because it is walking distance to the next barangay with school. The municipality has 4 public schools located strategically and 2 private secondary schools located at the poblacion area. There are two tertiary schools (1 private and 1 public) and one vocational schools offering only automotive servicing NC II. The tables below show the educational facilities and recent enrolment of the municipality.

Table 11. Inventory of Educational Facilities, Private & Public Schools
Educational Facilities Public School Private School
Source: Primary Survey; DepEd District Office/Private Schools
  1. SPED Center
1 -
  1. Day Care Centers/Prep. Schools
37 12
  1. Kindergarten Schools
29 12
  1. Elementary Schools
29 8
  1. Secondary Schools
4 2
          Junior High School 4 2
          Senior High School 3 2
  1. Tertiary School
1 1
  1. Vocational School 
0 1
Table 12. Enrollment per Level, SY 2017-2018
Enrollment
SY 2016-2017
Public Schools Private Schools TOTAL
Male Female Male Female Male Female Total
Source: Private & Public Schools
SPEd Class 54 35 - - 54 35  89
Day Care Centers 448 463 - - 448 463 911
Nursery/Pre-Kinder     132 112 132 112 244
Kindergarten 499 495 132 126 631 621 1,252
Elementary Schools 3,173 3,011 546 486 3,719 3,497 7,216
    Grade 1 427 358 97 90 524 448 972
    Grade 2 507 471 109 83 616 554 1,170
    Grade 3 526 514 98 76 624 590 1,214
    Grade 4 563 528 83 90 646 618 1,264
    Grade 5 562 567 81 75 643 642 1,285
    Grade 6  588 573 78 72 666 645 1,311
Secondary Schools 2,037 1,990 935 1,028 2,972 3,018 5,990
    Grade 7 453 412 190 188 643 600 1,243
    Grade 8 434 393 148 177 582 570 1,152
    Grade 9 421 361 158 188 579 549 1,128
    Grade 10 314 357 164 170 478 527 1,005
Sub-Total 1,622 1,523 660 723 2,282 2,246 4,528
    Grade 11 237 251 158 160 395 411 806
    Grade 12 178 216 117 145 295 361 656
Sub-Total 415 467 275 305 690 772 1,462
Vocational - -          
Tertiary Schools
First Semester
239 253 12 8 251 261   512
    Second Semester              
Table 13. Participation Rate per Level, SY 2017-2018
Level School Going Age Population No. Children in-school Participation Rate
Source: School Going Age Population is computed based on PSA Census of Population 2015/ MPDO/DepEd/Day Care Centers/Private Schools
Day Care/Pre-School
(3 to 4 y/o)
2,567 1,155 44.99
Elementary
(5 to 11 y/o)
8,736 8,468 96.93
Secondary
(12 to 17y/o)
6,990 5,990 85.69
Table 14. Total Population 5 Years Old and Over by Highest Grade/Year Completed, Sex, Age, and City/Municipality: 2015
Highest Grade/Year Completed, Sex and City/Municipality Total Population 5 Years Old and Over
Both Sexes Male Female
Source: Philippine Statistics Authority, 2015 Census of Population
No Grade Completed 915 470 445
Pre-School 1,547 796 751
Special Education 35 18 17
Elementary 19,185 10,235 8,950
1st - 4th Grade 8,422 4,546 3,876
5th - 6th Grade 2,965 1,638 1,327
Graduate 7,798 4,051 3,747
High School 21,923 11,270 10,653
Undergraduate 8,197 4,334 3,863
Graduate 13,726 6,936 6,790
Post-Secondary 883 262 621
Undergraduate 11 5 6
Graduate 872 257 615
College Undergraduate 6,264 3,114 3,150
Academic Degree Holder 7,518 3,242 4,276
Post Baccalaureate 29 12 17
Not Stated 19 10 9
Total 58,318 29,429 28,889
Table 15. Literacy of the Household Population 10 Years Old and Over by Age Group and Sex, 2015
Age Group and City/Municipality  Household Population
10 years old and over
 Literate Literacy Rate
(%)
 Both Sexes  Male Female  Both Sexes  Male Female
Source: Philippine Statistics Authority, 2015 Census of Population
10 - 14 5,819 3,047 2,772 5,805 3,035 2,770 99.75
15 - 19 5,630 2,987 2,643 5,615 2,975 2,640 99.73
20 - 24 5,739 2,895 2,844 5,721 2,884 2,837 99.67
25 - 29 5,412 2,784 2,628 5,403 2,779 2,624 99.83
30 - 34 4,874 2,539 2,335 4,856 2,527 2,329 99.63
35 - 39 4,567 2,323 2,244 4,560 2,318 2,242 99.85
40 - 44 4,014 2,050 1,964 3,998 2,043 1,955 99.60
45 - 49 3,966 2,033 1,933 3,946 2,021 1,925 99.50
50 - 54 3,418 1,737 1,681 3,402 1,726 1,676 99.53
55 - 59 2,811 1,405 1,406 2,805 1,402 1,403 99.79
60 - 64 2,096 984 1,112 2,089 982 1,107 99.67
65 years old and over 3,734 1,483 2,251 3,681 1,467 2,214 98.58
Total 52,080 26,267 25,813 51,881 26,159 25,722 99.62

F. HOUSING

Based on the CBMS 2012 survey, there were 14,013 dwelling units regardless of the type of structure or construction materials used. There are 216 or 1.54% of households who are living in makeshift houses and there are 268 or 1.91% households who are informal settlers.

G. WATER UTILITIES

  1. Agriculture Use: San Mateo is one of the few municipalities of Isabela where all its agricultural lands are irrigated. The situation is attributed to its proximity to the Magat Dam, and as such farmers can till their lands at least twice a year.
  2. Domestic Use: All households within the municipality are depending on ground water as their main source of domestic water supply. The LGU Urban Water System and Sanitation Project now San Mateo Water Supply System (SMWSS) started its operation in January 2001, serving the Poblacion and the four (4) nearby barangays.

    There are 12,301 shallow wells serving 86.94% households of the municipality and the 13.05% households get their water from other sources of water supply (Level 3) but 5.84% of the total households have shared water utilities.

H. COMMUNICATION

  1. Telephone Services

    Telephone line is provided by DIGITEL& PLDT for domestic and international services. To support the deficiency telephone services, cellular phones are penetrating the lines of modern communication. SMART, GLOBE, SUNCELLULAR & Ericson Telecommunication services are available with a relay station located at Barangay Malasin, Barangay Old Centro 1, Sinamar Norte, Salinungan East and San Antonio, San Mateo, Isabela.
  2. Internet Services

    One of the major modern means of communication in the municipality is thru internet access. To date, there are 38 commercial internet service providers operating in the municipality. Most cafes are located at the Poblacion area.

    Internet connection is also accessible anywhere in the locality thru the use of the wireless broadband powered by SMART, GLOBE and SUNCELLULAR.
  3. Postal Services

    Postal services within the municipality are provided by the Philippine Postal Corporation based at the municipal compound, manned by one (1) postmaster, four (4) letter carriers and one (1) postal teller. The services rendered are processing and delivery of both foreign and domestic mails which include registered mail/check, express ordinary printed matter, package, money order and others.

    In addition, the LBC Express, Inc., a private remittance and courier company, is operating in the municipality with their branch office located along national highway at the Poblacion area. It offers parcel and package deliveries and cash remittances via sea, air, and land. It also offers a track-and-trace system to monitor the status of all shipments made via SMS and Internet (Via the LBC Express Website).
  4. Broadcast Media/Local TV

    Television reception has improved through the television network operated by a private entity. There is a cable station named Bonggao operating in the municipality which is located within the Poblacion and the area of coverage is the whole municipality.

    Radios are found in all houses as a means of entertainment and source of news or information of the people especially those at the rural barangays. Commercial radio broadcasting stations in Manila, Tuguegarao, Ilagan, and in the City of Cauayan and Santiago can be received in town.
  5. Print Media

    Media publication is available in the municipality. A local newspaper which is named as UGNAYAN Today was launched last June 2005. It was later named as Agro-Ecological Hub launched last March 2007 and was changed to the Galing San Mateo Hub last 2016. It is published quarterly. This is a very good project of the LGU which serves as a vehicle of information to what the LGU is doing and to what extent of participation our constituents is extending for the development of our town. It is also used to publish articles of good practices to be emulated by interested parties, thus contributing to the progress and the quality of life of our people.

I. POWER & ELECTRIFICATION

Electrical power services are provided by the National Grid Corporation of the Philippines (NGCP) through the facilities of the Isabela Electric Cooperative (ISELCO-I) with 2 power generating hydro plant, Magat A and Magat B, with 1.41 and 1.08 MW capacity respectively. Both are located at Villa Beltran, Ramon, Isabela with 8 sub-station located at (1) Victoria, Alicia, Isabela, (2) San Antonio, San Mateo, Isabela, (3) Malapat, Cordn, (4) Prenza, Cauayan City, (5) Rizal, Santiago City, (6) Nappacu Pequeño, Reina Mercedes, (7) Distruct 1, Cauayan City, and (8) Batal, Santiago City.

Power service is available 24 hours a day and all barangays are already energized with 14,507 total connections. Incidences of power outages/interruptions are seldom except when there are necessary repair and maintenance. Households not served with power use kerosene for lighting facilities.

TRANSPORTATION

  1. Roads and Bridges

    A total road network spanning 206.099 km. traverses the municipality. It consists of 24.90 km. of national road (concrete); 2.5 km. of provincial road (concrete); 13.252 km. of the municipal streets, 11.847 concrete & 1.405 gravel; and 165.447 km. of barangay roads, concrete: 63.663 km & gravel: 101.784 km. The classification of roads by type of construction shows 102.910 km. are paved (concreted); 103.189 km. are gravel roads. San Mateo has 14 bridges with the total length of approximately 505.5 linear meters.
  2. Land Transportation Vehicles

    Tricycle (for hire) 1,010 Jitney 400
    Motorcycle 2,400 Private Car 1,500
    Van (for hire) 300 Bicycle 2,500
    Truck 1,000 Buses 7

K. HEALTH, NUTRITION & SANITATION

There are one (1) RHU which is animal bite center accredited and TB Dots accredited, two hospitals (one public and one private), two (2) private lying-in clinic, ten (10) private medical clinics, six (6) dental clinics, four (4) diagnostic laboratory, four (4) Optical Clinics, thirty-three (33) Barangay Health Stations (26 BHS & 7 Multi-Purpose Building as BHS) and five (5) ambulance operating in the municipality.

There were ninety-eight (98) doctors, six (6) dentists, seventy-five (75) nurses, twenty-eight (28) midwives, seven (7) medical technologists, four (4) optometrists, three (3) physical therapists, four (4) radiologic technologists, one (1) nutrition officer, two (2) dieticians and one (1) sanitary inspector serving the municipality.

The table below will show the result of the OPT on January 2017 conducted to 5,577 children from 0-59 months old using the CGS. It shows that 96.83% of children are in normal weight while 1.24% children are overweight and 1.94% are malnourished children which is define as underweight and severely underweight.

With this scenario, supplemental feeding was conducted in the different barangays. On October 2017, the 20 severely underweight children became 13 while the 88 underweight children became 85. There are 10 children who were rehabilitated, thus became normal in weight.

Table 10. Nutritional Status of Children, 0 to 59 months old, by Sex
Nutrition Status Male Female Total Percentage
Source: MHO, Nutrition Office
Normal 2,749 2,651 5,400 96.83%
Underweight 46 42 88 1.58%
Severely underweight 10 10 20 0.36%
Overweight 49 20 69 1.24%
TOTAL 2,854 2,723 5,577 100.00%

The nutritional status of school children during the SY 2017-2018 covers a total of 7,562 school children weighed, including kindergarten pupils. Table 11 shows that 85.23% of the school children are in normal weight while 9.6% are malnourished which include the severely wasted (2.04%) and wasted (7.56%) school children and 5.17% of school children are overweight and obese.

Table 11. Nutritional Status of School Children (Public Schools), SY 2017-2018
Nutrition Status Male Female Total Percentage
(%)
Source: Department of Education/Nutrition Office
Normal 3,227 3,218 6,445 85.23
Severely Wasted 88 66 154 2.04
Wasted 310 262 572 7.56
Overweight 178 119 297 3.93
Obese 69 25 94 1.24
Total Weighed 3,872 3,690 7,562 100

Comparative health indices for the year 2012 to 2017 is shown in the table below. It shows a decreasing trend of crude birth rate from 2012 to present. This indicates that births of children are lessen every year except for the year 2016 that increases a percent from the year 2015. Crude death rate also shows a decreasing trend from year 2015 to 2017 with a rate of 6.24 and 4.92 respectively. The number 1 cause of death among the cases is still cardio vascular diseases which is the same as last year and other causes of mortality is determined in table 15. Infant Mortality Rate shows also increasing trend from 2014 to 2017. Causes of deaths among infants are stillbirths, 2 cases, Intrauterine fetal death, 2 cases and others as seen in table 13. For the maternal mortality rate, it shows no case of maternal death from year 2015 to 2017. Cases of death among under five children shows a fluctuating trend, causes of death is shown table 14. The cases of teenage pregnancy in the municipality is decreasing from 271 cases on 2012 down to 152 reported cases on 2017.

Table 12. Comparative Health Indices, 2012 to 2017
  2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017
Source: Municipal Health Office
Crude Birth Rate 20.4 18.7 19.4 17.22 18.28 15.25
Crude Death Rate 5.6 5.6 5 6.4 5.26 4.92
Infant Mortality Rate 9.4 6.78 4 7.27 7.6 16.61
Maternal Mortality Rate 0.78 0 0.81 0 0 0
Under Five Mortality Rate - 4.2 4.8 10 2.5 4.88
Teenage Pregnancy 271 227 273 196 156 152
Table 13. Causes of Infant Mortality, 2017
Causes No. of Cases
M F Total
Source: Municipal Health Office, 2018
Stillbirth   2 2
IUFD   2 2
Pneumonia   1 1
Community Acquired Pneumonia   1 1
Anemia 1   1
Heart Disease 1   1
Sepsis 1   1
Polyhydramnios   1 1
Meconeum Aspiration Syndrome 1   1
Utero Placental Insufficiency   1 1
Perinatal Asphyxia 1   1
Prematurity   1 1
Intraventricular Hemorrhage 1   1
Brain Hypoxia 2’ Cord Loop 1   1
TOTAL 7 10 17
Table 14. Leading Causes of Under Five Mortality, 2017
Causes No. of Cases
Male Female Total
Source: Municipal Health Office, 2018
Pneumonia 0 1 1
Dehydration 2’ to Age 1 0 1
Congenital Heart Disease 0 1 1
Cardio Pulmonary Arrest 2’ Drowning 2 0 2
TOTAL 3 2 5
Table 15. Ten Leading Causes of Morbidity, 2017
Causes No. of Cases
M F Total
Source: Municipal Health Office, 2018
Upper-Respiratory Tract Infection 1,694 2,088 3,782
Animal Bite 788 734 1,522
Hypertension 466 795 1,261
Vertigo/Dizziness 450 515 665
Severe Viral Infection 198 234 432
Fever 169 221 390
Urinary Tract Infection 99 261 360
Headache 57 174 231
Bronchitis 911 131 224
LBM/Acute Gastro Enteritis 99 124 223
Table 16. Ten Leading Causes of Mortality, 2017
Causes No. of Cases
M F Total
Source: Municipal Health Office, 2018
Cardio Vascular Disease 69 35 104
Cancer (all forms) 20 15 35
Pneumonia 12 10 22
Senility/Old Age 6 12 18
Diabetes Mellitus 6 5 11
Cardiac Arrest 7 4 11
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease 7 3 10
Multiple Organ Failure 3 6 9
Vehicular Accident 7 0 7
Pulmonary Tuberculosis 3 2 5

L. SPORTS & RECREATION

The Rizal Park now called Freedom Park, the Children’s Park, Municipal Eco-Park and the Eco-Parks in the different barangays are the beautiful spots for recreation, picnicking and unwinding. There are also five (5) mini-resorts operating in the municipality: Palm Garden Pavillon, Dagupan Resort, Villa Tita Resort, Elija’s Resort and Perez Private Resort. The first two mini-resorts have pavilion for small gatherings while the last is a private mini resort for family gatherings. These resorts have almost the same facilities except for Villa Teresita which has rooms for its visiting guest. Each of the resort is being managed and owned by a Private Sector.

Sports facilities included one (1) oval/playground, thirty-three (33) basketball courts, thrity-three (33) volleyball courts, one (1) table tennis court, one (1) lawn tennis court, one (1) function hall for taekwondo and seven (7) billiard halls.

M. PROTECTIVE SERVICES

There are three (3) PCOs, twenty-seven (27) Police Non-Commissioned Officers and four (4) non-uniformed personnel in the Philippine National Police (PNP) contingent. The police have a police law enforcement communication system, one (1) radio base, one (1) patrol car, one (1) altiz car, and one (1) motor big bike. The jail has only two (2) cells, for male and for female.

The firefighting facilities of the municipality include two (2) fire trucks, 5 pcs. 1.5”x 50m and 4 pcs. 2”x50m hoses, 3 units of 10 lbs. fire extinguishers and other apparatus & equipment. There are fourteen (14) firemen manning the fire station.

San Mateo Municipal Jail is located at Brgy. Marasat Pequeño consisting of one (1) male adult cells, one (1) female adult cell, administrative office, and kitchen. It is presently manned by one (1) officer and twelve (12) BJMP non-officers. The jail clustered three (3) municipalities namely: San Mateo, Ramon and San Isidro, Isabela.

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